Q&A with Mike Thorn on Hellnotes

  1. What authors influenced you growing up? Who are you reading now?

As a young kid, I was really excited by J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and R. L. Stine. Discovering Stephen King as a preteen was a big deal, and the same goes for encountering Hubert Selby Jr. in my teens.

These days, I try to read as widely as possible. I’m currently making my way through Drawn Up from Deep Places, by Gemma Files, which is terrific. I was recently floored by two Henry James novels—The Portrait of a Lady and The Bostonians.

Read the full Q&A.

Mike Thorn’s 50 Favorite Horror Films of the Decade

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Today on Ink Heist, we are excited to welcome author Mike Thorn to the site with a list of his 50 favorite Horror films from the last decade. If there is one thing we love as much as dark fiction here at Ink Heist, it’s dark films. We watch a TON of movies throughout the year, and it seems like every time we hit our streaming services, we struggle to find things we haven’t seen. That’s where Mike’s list comes in handy and another reason why it’s so interesting. There is a good balance of more well-known mainstream films mixed with titles that are a little more obscure. A huge thanks to Mike for sharing this list with us. Not only did we find a lot of films we want to check out, we think it will generate a good discussion. What are some of your favorite Horror films?

See the full list.

Eli Roth Replaces Trademark Irreverence with Quiet Reverence for The House with a Clock in Its Walls

“At first glance, it’s difficult to situate The House with a Clock in Its Walls within director Eli Roth’s filmography. Following a politically reckless triptych that studied the implications of mass socialization through online platforms (The Green Inferno [2013], Knock Knock [2015] and Death Wish [2018]), this tonally scattershot kiddie Gothic seems almost to surface from nowhere. In some sense, it’s worthwhile to view the film completely on its own terms; but when dislocated from the rest of Roth’s ouevre, it offers little foundation for serious critical engagement. The film is flatly and almost numbingly pleasant. It’s over-designed but not to the point of genuine exuberance; occasionally amusing but never that funny; periodically stirring but by no means truly creepy; and unlike every one of its filmmaker’s preceding films, it moves through its entire runtime without ever straying near the territory of bad taste.”

Read the full review in Vague Visages.

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