New Mike Thorn Story in Tales to Terrify

tales-to-terrify-logo

For episode 376, Tales to Terrify has released its audio adaptation of Mike Thorn’s latest short story “@GorgoYama2013” (read by Spencer DiSparti).

Also featured on this episode: part 2 of Drew Sebesteny reading Arthur Machen’s genre classic The Great God Pan.

Suzy Michael Reviews Darkest Hours for High Fever Books

“I truly enjoyed reading this book. It is evident through his writing that Thorn has a true love for the horror genre. Each of the stories were distinct and well thought out. He can write subtle horror and then switch to something weird and morbid. He masterfully uses imagery to make his fictional work all that more realistic and disturbing. But he also leaves a lot up to the reader’s own imagination, which doesn’t always work, but in this case it was beautifully executed.”

Read the full review.

Thinking Horror: Volume 2 Now Available

th

Thinking Horror: Volume 2 is now available to order. It includes Mike Thorn’s essay “Collective Abjection: Social Horror in Stephen King’s It,” cover art by Stephen Wilson, interviews with genre giants (Steve Rasnic Tem, Lisa Tuttle, John Skipp and Nick Mamatas) and essays by many contemporary luminaries (including Gemma Files, Michael Cisco and Christopher Burke).

Order now.

Fated, Faithful, Fatal: Ranking and Reviewing 25 Years of Marilyn Manson

“Twenty-five years ago, Marilyn Manson released his debut album Portrait of an American Family. Ten albums and multiple band changes later, his catalogue presents an extensive, medium-crossing statement on a culture he both reviles and embodies. Manson’s oeuvre presents a messy, self-contradicting statement, bound up in its creator’s narcissism and his uniquely Ouroboros-like relationship to the popular American landscape.”

Read the full article in Vague Visages.

 

Darkest Hours author Mike Thorn talks to Josiah Morgan about writing, genre and influences

k1

Josiah Morgan and I have been online acquaintances for several years, bonding initially over our mutual passion for film. I recently read his debut poetry collection Inside the Castle and was stunned by its formal sophistication, thematic complexity and breadth of reference. I sent him a message asking if he would like to publish a chat with me about writing, genre and influences and he kindly agreed.

Our conversation is now available to read on Kendall Reviews.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑