2017 – Awards Eligibility & Publications Summary

Overall, 2017 has been good to me personally (I successfully defended my master’s thesis, was lucky enough to land a good job and published my debut short story collection); but on a global scale, yes, this year was hell. Here’s hoping for (at the very least) Trump’s impeachment/resignation in 2018, or better yet, the beginnings of lasting reconstruction/systemic overhaul.

For me, horror fiction feels like the most sane way to depict the contemporary world. Here’s a list of all the fiction and non-fiction I published in 2017.

Darkest Hours (Unnerving)
DarkestHoursCoverMikeThorn
In the bleak landscape of Darkest Hours, people make decisions that lead them into extreme scenarios – sometimes bizarre, often horrific, always unexpected. Between this book’s covers you will find academics in distress; monsters abused by people; people terrorized by demons; ghostly reminiscences; resurrected trauma; and occult filmmaking. Ranging from satirical to dreadful, these stories share a distinct voice: urgent, sardonic, brutal, but always empathetic.

Seven of the sixteen stories in Darkest Hours were original publications (“Mictian Diabolus”; “A New Kind of Drug”; “Party Time”; “Fear and Grace”; “Economy These Days”; “Satanic Panic”; and “Fusion”).

I’m seriously, indescribably humbled by the early reception, both from critics and authors I admire. Here are some excerpts from blurbs and reviews:

“Perfectly paced from the first sentence, these stories grab you by the collar with the urgency of mortal danger. Highly recommended.”
— S.P. Miskowski, author of Strange is the Night

“When you first encounter Thorn’s writing, a number of qualities impress themselves: the macabre intelligence (brutal really), the chilling wit, the naturalness of the dialogue. Plus there’s the skill and style of the prose. It may all play out like a nightmare, but a terrible logic remains inherent.”
— Robert Dunbar, author of The Pines and Willy

“Mike Thorn has delivered a promising debut with this collection showing off his commitment to stories of nuance, heart, and of course… darkness.”
— Daniel Braum, author of The Night Marchers and Other Strange Tales

“Terrifying and sly, Mike Thorn writes with refreshing originality and hides fangs behind a smile.”
— John C. Foster, author of Mister White

“Mike Thorn’s debut story collection is not to be missed by those who enjoy an academic intellect with a potent flair for fiction.”
— Dustin LaValley, author of A Soundless Dawn

“Mike Thorn is brilliant.”
Waylon Jordan, iHorror

“…the most diverse selection of stories that I’ve ever read from a single author.”
Lilyn G., Sci-Fi & Scary

“I’m reminded not only of some of the best Stephen King from Skeleton Crew or Night Shift, but also of some of the more bizarre stories from Clive Barker’s Books Of Blood.”
— Tim Murr, Biff Bam Pop

“The hallmark of great horror is that it […] surprises, scares, and most importantly, entertains. Darkest Hours succeeds on all these levels.”
— Brandon Wilson, The Weal

dmd28smallFive of my stories were included in other anthologies and magazines.

Choo-Choo.” Polar Borealis Magazine, vol. 4, edited by R. Graeme Cameron (also in Darkest Hours).

Sabbatical.” Dark Moon Digest, vol. 28, edited by Max Booth III & Lori Michelle (also in Darkest Hours).

Entropy Major.” Unnerving Magazine, vol. 3, edited by Eddie Generous.

Speaking of Ghosts.” Vague Visages, edited by Q.V. Hough (also in Darkest Hours).

“Lucio Schluter.” DarkFuse’s “Darkborne Muse” series, edited by Shane Staley (also in Darkest Hours).

unnervingsmallThis year I began a review column for Unnerving Magazine called “Thorn’s Thoughts,” in which I provide in-depth analyses of horror and dark fiction books. To date, I’ve provided eleven write-ups for that column.

2017 saw the beginning of another column: “Devious Dialogues,” a horror-themed series I co-author with A.M. Stanley. We have written nine entries so far.

Additionally, I wrote three more book reviews for Vague Visages and thirteen film reviews/articles for a number of other venues:

Like Jagged Teeth – Betty Rocksteady’s Supernatural Bad Dream Novella.” Vague Visages.

Gender and Genre in Aaron J. French’s Festival.” Vague Visages.

Pain and Three Kinds of Death in Dustin LaValley’s A Soundless Dawn.” Vague Visages.

Mike Thorn’s 10 favourite horror films from the 2010s.” Kendall Reviews.

Underrated ’97 – Mike Thorn.” Rupert Pupkin Speaks.

Andy Muschietti’s It Struggles with Adaptation.” Vague Visages.

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Hostel: Part II and the Monster of Neoliberal Late-Capitalism.” The Film Stage.

No Desire If It’s Not Forbidden’: Dread, Eroticism, and Text Messaging in Personal Shopper.” The Seventh Row.

The Aesthetic and Formal Challenges of Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt.” Vague Visages.

 

Diary of the Dead and George A. Romero’s Formal Self-Awareness.” The Film Stage.

The Many Peculiar Virtues of Wes Craven’s My Soul to Take.” Vague Visages.

Moments of Revelation in Martin Scorsese’s Silence and Shutter Island.” Vague Visages.

Genre Trauma in M. Night Shyamalan’s Split.” MUBI Notebook.

What I Learned from Martin Scorsese’s Life Lessons.” Vague Visages.

Toxic Masculinity and Empathetic Comedy: Martin Scorsese’s Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore.” Vague Visages.

The Way of the Future: The Connections Between Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull and The Aviator.” Vague Visages.

Here’s to more exciting happenings in 2018…

Guest Post on Kendall Reviews: “Mike Thorn’s 10 favourite horror films from the 2010s”


Horror cinema still suffers from the burden of David Edelstein’s reductive, vaguely moralizing mid-2000s condemnation of “torture porn.” Throughout the 2010s, the genre has mostly strayed away from the urgency, viscera and political heft of films like The Devil’s Rejects (2005) and Hostel (2005), opting instead for low-budget supernatural found footage fare (see most of Blumhouse’s output) and prestige exercises in genre-deaf bluffing (see most of the most popularly praised titles of the past three or so years). I tend to like horror films that proudly inhabit their genre, paying respect to its central affect while also demonstrating formal knowledge and identifying new possibilities. I prefer to see horror films pushing boundaries within a contemporary context than vaguely “cerebral” repetitions of the past. Limiting myself to one title per director, I’ve highlighted ten of my favorite horror films released between 2010 and 2017 (organized chronologically).

Check out the list on Kendall Reviews.

“All in the Family” by Jennifer Loring & Mike Thorn Slated for Publication in Tales from the Id – Behind the Mask

Capture

The brilliant Jennifer Loring and I co-wrote a domestic occult horror-thriller with shades of Satanic ritualism and urban myth. It’s being published in Behind the Mask – Tales from the Id, edited by Steve Dillon and featuring reprints by genre legends like Clive Barker, Ramsey Campbell, Algernon Blackwood and Edgar Allan Poe. The book also includes a piece by Mark Allan Gunnells, who wrote an awesome novella called #MakeHalloweenScaryAgain for Halloween Carnival Volume 1.

New Review of Darkest Hours in SCI-FI & SCARY

Book cover for Darkest Hours
“Although the stories vary dramatically in chosen subject, by the end of the collection, certain things make themselves known time and again. Specifically, smoking, heavy metal, and – oddly enough – academics.  I’m sure people who are more into the literary dissection side of things will have fun picking apart the stories contained in Darkest Hours. I’m not one for doing that, though.”

Read the full review in Sci-Fi & Scary.

Darkest Hours Now Available on Canadian, US and UK Amazon!

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Darkest Hours has finally made its way to Canadian Amazon. It can also be purchased on UK and US Amazon. Get your copy here.

“The element of surprise is a tribute to Thorn’s ingenuity; the assuredness of his prose is due to his extensive knowledge of the horror genre.”
— S.P. Miskowski, author of Strange is the Night

“Mike Thorn is brilliant.”
— Waylon Jordan, iHorror

“When you first encounter Thorn’s writing, a number of qualities impress themselves: the macabre intelligence (brutal really), the chilling wit, the naturalness of the dialogue. Plus there’s the skill and style of the prose.”
— Robert Dunbar, author of The Pines and Willy

“This is subversive literary horror.”
— Tim Murr, Biff Bam Pop

“Mike Thorn has delivered a promising debut with this collection showing off his commitment to stories of nuance, heart, and of course… darkness.”
— Daniel Braum, author of The Night Marchers and Other Strange Tales

“The hallmark of great horror is that it surprises, scares, and most importantly, entertains. Darkest Hours succeeds on all these levels.”
— Brandon Wilson, The Weal

“Mike Thorn writes with refreshing originality and hides fangs behind a smile.”
— John C. Foster, author of Mister White

“Mike Thorn’s debut story collection is not to be missed by those who enjoy an academic intellect with a potent flair for fiction.”
— Dustin LaValley, author of A Soundless Dawn

Mike Thorn Brings Illumination to the “Darkest Hours”: Interview in iHorror

ihorrorinterview“If you ever want to have a truly fascinating conversation, ask an author about his or her work.  Seriously, there are few things more riveting than listening to the inspiration and their personal process of writing, and even more, the subjects that sparked an author’s imagination that brought a story to life.  Fortunately for me, I get to do that a lot, and Mike Thorn, whose recent debut anthology Darkest Hours just released, had plenty to say about his work and his process.”

Read the full interview in iHorror.