Mike Thorn Interviews Niall Howell, Author of Only Pretty Damned

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Niall and I first met as undergrads at Mount Royal University. From what I remember, we first connected through our mutual love of film, either through a course or a club of some kind. It wasn’t long before I learned that Niall was also a fiction writer, and we started exchanging excerpts from our works-in-progress. Niall’s rare, formidable talent was immediately evident to me—I saw in all his work a unique sense of humour and a mastery of pacing, plot and voice. After reading his phenomenal debut novel Only Pretty Damned (available now through NeWest Press), I reached out asking if he’d like to do a Q&A. He kindly agreed, and the dialogue below is the result of our email exchanges.

Read the full interview on Kendall Reviews.

 

Some Kind of Connection: Loss and Technology in the Films of Sophy Romvari

I initially connected with Sophy Romvari through Twitter about two years ago, after seeing her lyrical short film It’s Him. Since then, I have watched almost all of her films and have been consistently fascinated by the ways that she hybridizes cinematic modes and genres. Her filmography exhibits strong visual aptitude and raises complex questions about the divisions between filmic truth and representation. Sophy and I have chatted sporadically, touching on everything from M. Night Shyamalan to documentaries to the connections between genre and trauma, and I am always curious to hear her ideas about cinema and the creative process. After recently watching In Dog Years, a moving reflection on death and the powerful connections between human and nonhuman animal friends, I reached out to Sophy asking if she would be interested in doing an interview about her work. The conversation below is transcribed from our e-mail exchanges.

Read the full interview in Vague Visages.

Suzy Michael Reviews Darkest Hours for High Fever Books

“I truly enjoyed reading this book. It is evident through his writing that Thorn has a true love for the horror genre. Each of the stories were distinct and well thought out. He can write subtle horror and then switch to something weird and morbid. He masterfully uses imagery to make his fictional work all that more realistic and disturbing. But he also leaves a lot up to the reader’s own imagination, which doesn’t always work, but in this case it was beautifully executed.”

Read the full review.

Thinking Horror: Volume 2 Now Available

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Thinking Horror: Volume 2 is now available to order. It includes Mike Thorn’s essay “Collective Abjection: Social Horror in Stephen King’s It,” cover art by Stephen Wilson, interviews with genre giants (Steve Rasnic Tem, Lisa Tuttle, John Skipp and Nick Mamatas) and essays by many contemporary luminaries (including Gemma Files, Michael Cisco and Christopher Burke).

Order now.

Fated, Faithful, Fatal: Ranking and Reviewing 25 Years of Marilyn Manson

“Twenty-five years ago, Marilyn Manson released his debut album Portrait of an American Family. Ten albums and multiple band changes later, his catalogue presents an extensive, medium-crossing statement on a culture he both reviles and embodies. Manson’s oeuvre presents a messy, self-contradicting statement, bound up in its creator’s narcissism and his uniquely Ouroboros-like relationship to the popular American landscape.”

Read the full article in Vague Visages.

 

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